Delhi Metro (Guide)

Delhi Metro represents a rapid transit system that provides various services for Delhi and its satellite cities of Noida, Gurgaon, Faridabad, Ghaziabad, Ballabhgarh, and Bahadurgarh in the National Capital Region of India. Currently, it is the largest and busiest subway in India and the second oldest after the Kolkata Metro. The system includes eleven color-coded regular lines that are serving 285 stations. The total length of all lines equals 348 kilometers. The complex has a mix of at-grade, underground and elevated stations and is using both standard-gauge and broad-gauge. Subway operates over 2700 trips daily.

Information

Stations

Delhi metro consists of over 140 stations, dispersed throughout Delhi NCR, Old, and New Delhi, Noida, Gurgaon, and Faridabad. The number is increasing as the metro infrastructure has been a boon for passengers. Also, the widely spread system makes a few residential colonies and business localities accessible to everyone. The Delhi Metro management is efficient and has worked diligently from the day of its establishment. Due to this reason, one can travel from Noida to Delhi and Delhi to Gurgaon seamlessly. The design and construction of the stations take up to 2.5 million commuters every day and is considered one of the busiest metros in the world. The following five metro stations are the most active and most important metro stations of the capital. Rajiv Chowk Metro Station Enormous and crowded metro station of New Delhi, Rajiv Chowk represents an endless journey for the riders. This station can be found in the heart of Delhi, and people can easily reach Connaught Place from it. It is estimated that the station caters to around 500 000 travelers every day. One of the main reasons why Rajiv Chowk station is one of the busiest is that it connects to few other routes, like Barakhamba Road and Palika Bazaar, both of which are noteworthy for offices and shopping as well. Vaishali Metro Station This station is amongst the busiest ones of Delhi NCR. It includes large parking lots on its premises. A sudden increase in the property prices followed metro connectivity, of noteworthy areas such as Vaishali, Indirapuram, Vasundhara,

Lines

Red Line The Red Line was the first one of the subway when it opened. It connects Shaheed Sthal in the east to Rithala in the west. With a total length of 34.69 kilometers, the part of the line is elevated, and the part is at grade, crossing the Yamuna River between Kashmere Gate and Shastri Park stations. The inauguration of the first stretch between Tis Hazari and Shahdara led to the collapse of the ticketing system because the line was overloaded with the number of people that exceeded the capacity to four times. Yellow Line After the red one, the Yellow line was second to go. It was the first underground line in Delhi Metro. Currently, the line connects Samaypur Badli with Huda City Centre that is 49 kilometers from each other. The southern and northern parts of it are elevated when the central section runs underground. The line includes the second deepest Metro Station of India. Chawri Bazar is situated 25 meters below ground level. Blue Line The third line of the metro was the first to connect areas located outside Delhi. The most elevated line covers 56.61 kilometers and connects the satellite city of Noida in the east with Dwarka Sub City in the west. The first section between Dwarka and Barakhamba road was inaugurated in 2005. GreenLine The fifth line of the Delhi Metro opened in 2010. It was the first line on standard gauge. The route runs between Inderlok and Brigadier Hoshiyar Sing with a branch line connecting the Ashok Park Main station with Kirti Nagar station that lies on the Blue line. The line consist

Ticketing

Automatic Ticketing For the first time in the country, Delhi Metro has introduced passenger and ticketing control through a completely Automatic Fare Collection system. The ticket, which could be both a token or card can be purchased from the Customer Care Centre and Ticket Counter. Subsequently, the passenger proceeds to one of the few gates that separate the Paid Area from the Unpaid Area. At the entrance, passengers should hold the ticket close to the machine to the right of the gate. If the ticket is valid, the gates open automatically, and the passenger will be able to pass to the Paid Area. In case of not having a valid pass, then the passenger will need to contact the Customer Care Staff. Ticket Options A travelcard represents the most convenient option for a frequent passengers. The minimum amount t of buying a new card is Rs 150/- including refundable security of Rs. 50/-. Recharge of the card is possible at Customer Care Centers located at any station with a minimum value of Rs. 200/- and up to Rs. 3000/- Following options are available for passengers who are interested in recharging their travel cards: The card can be recharged by paying cash at the Customer Care Center which is available at all stations. The minimum amount to put on smart cards is Rs. 200/- after that in multiples of Rs. 100 up to Rs. 3000. Tourist cards The one-Day card is available for Rs 200/- (Rs 150 + Rs 50 refundable security) The three-Day card can be purchased at the cost of Rs 500/- (Rs. 450 + Rs 50 refundable security) Token Passeng

More about Delhi Metro (Guide)

Delhi Metro (Guide)

Introduction

Delhi Metro represents a rapid transit system that provides various services for Delhi and its satellite cities of Noida, Gurgaon, Faridabad, Ghaziabad, Ballabhgarh, and Bahadurgarh in the National Capital Region of India. Currently, it is the largest and busiest subway in India and the second oldest after the Kolkata Metro. The system includes eleven color-coded regular lines that are serving 285 stations. The total length of all lines equals 348 kilometers. The complex has a mix of at-grade, underground and elevated stations and is using both standard-gauge and broad-gauge. Subway operates over 2700 trips daily.

History

The concept of a mass rapid transit system of New Delhi first started because of a travel and traffic characteristics study, which was carried out in the city in 1969. Over the next years, a lot of official committees were commissioned to examine the issues that were related to route alignment, technology, and Governmental jurisdiction. In 1984, the Urban Arts commission proposed the development of a multi-modal public transportation complex, which included constructions of three underground mass rapid transit corridors and augmenting already existent suburban railway and road transport systems.

When technical studies and the raising of finance were still in progress, the city expanded in terms of a twofold rise of population and a five-fold increase in the number of vehicles from 1981 to 1998. For rectifying a situation, The Government of India and the Government of Delhi together set up a company named the Delhi Metro Rail Corporation. Elattuvalapil Sreedharan was selected as the managing director of the corporation.

Constructions

Physical construction works started on 1 October 1998. DMRC was entirely in charge of hiring people and making decisions regarding control funds and tenders. The DMRC hired the Hong Kong MTRC, which assisted as a technical consultant on rapid transit operation and construction techniques. Due to joint efforts, the construction went smoothly.

The Delhi Metro was built in three phases. Phase I consisted of a 65 km long route that included 58 stations. Thirteen kilometers of the way is underground, and the rest 52 are either elevated or on the surface. By inaugurating the Dwarka-Barakhamba Road corridor of the Blue Line Phase, I was completed in October 2006. Phase II of the network consists of approximately 124.6 km of route and includes 85 stations. The PhasePhase was fully completed when its last line opened in 2011.

Phase III consists of 28 underground stations, two lines, and eleven route extensions.